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Biographical Index of Ministers — Ha - Hn

Biographies are developed by PHC volunteers and staff from original research and from various published sources, such as 1884 "Encyclopedia of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America," by Alfred Nevin. This list is constantly being updated. Corrections and additional materials, such as photos or drawings will be made from time to time. There also is a missionary biographical listing being prepared for this web site. During 2010, there will be a master index of ministers and missionaries to aid in searches. Thanks for your patience. Please email additional information or pictures to the PHC.

The Rev. Isaac Hadden
(ca. 1800)
   The Rev. Isaac Hadden was among the earliest of the ministers who settled in Alabama. A licentiate to preach the gospel of the Presbytery of South Carolina, he began the work of a missionary in 1823. He was ordained an evangelist at Montgomery, March 24, 1825. He had passed into the autumn of his life, having spent twenty-five years of his ministry within the region of country comprised within the bounds of the Synod of Alabama.

The Rev. Benjamin Hait
(ca. 1734 - June 27, 1779)
   The Rev. Benjamin Hait graduated at the College of New Jersey in 1754, and was licensed to preach the gospel by the Presbytery of New Brunswick, October 25, 1754, and sent to the Forks of the Delaware. He was ordained, December 4, 1755, and installed pastor of the Presbyterian Church at Amwell, NJ. While settled there, by order of Synod, he visited and supplied the southern vacancies. He gave up his charge in Amwell, in 1765. In 1776 he was settled at Connecticut Farms, NJ, and died there on June 27, 1779.

The Rev. David Hale
(b pre 1769)
   The Rev. David Hale was ordained to the gospel ministry by the Presbytery of Suffolk, Long Island, NY, on June 22, 1789, as pastor of the church at Bridgehampton.

The Rev. Charles Hall, D.D.
(June 23, 1799 - October 31, 1853)
   The Rev. Dr. Charles Hall was the eldest child of Jacob Hall, and was born on June 23, 1799, at Williamsport, Pennsylvania. When he was an infant, the family moved to Geneva, NY. He was graduated at Hamilton College in 1824, with the first honors of his class, studied theology at Princeton and was licensed to preach the gospel by the Presbytery of Newark, April 24, 1827. In that year he was called to the office of Assistant Secretary of the American Home Missionary Society in the City of New York and accepted the appointment. In the autumn of 1837 he was appointed one of the coordinate Secretaries for Correspondence and in this office he continued until his death on Oct. 31, 1853.
   Dr. Hall was for several years the editor of the Home Missionary and wrote a considerable part of each of the Annual Reports of the American Home Missionary Society during the twenty-five years that he was connected with it. He published a tract entitled "Plans and Motives for the Extension of Sabbath Schools" (for which he was awarded a prize of fifty dollars), the Daily Verse Expositor, consisting of a brief commentary on the Acts of the Apostles, a Plan for Systematic Benevolence, and a sermon on the Means of the World's Conversion, published in the National Preacher, 1841.

The Rev. James Hall, D.D.
(August 22, 1744 - July 25, 1826)
   The Rev. Dr. James Hall was born of Scotch-Irish parentage on August 22, 1744, at Carlisle, Pennsylvania. When he was eight years old, the family moved to North Carolina. He was graduated at the College of New Jersey (later Princeton) in 1744 [sic. 1774]; studied theology under the direction of Dr. Witherspoon, and was licensed to preach the gospel by the Presbytery of Orange in 1775 or 1776. On April 8th, 1778, he was installed pastor of the united congregations of Fourth Creek, Concord and Bethany, holding this relationship until 1790, when he was released from the pastorate of the first two churches, so that he might have more time to devote to the cause of domestic missions. His connection with the Bethany congregation continued during the remainder of his life.
   During the Revolution in 1779 he led a select company of cavalry on an expedition into South Carolina, performing the double office of commander and chaplain and was absent for several months. At the close of the war he set himself to restore the stated ordinances of the gospel where they had been discontinued. In 1793 he commenced his missionary excursions under the direction of a Commission of Synod. In the autumn of 1800, under a Commission of the General Assembly, he commenced a mission to Natchez, together with two other brethren whom the Synod had appointed to accompany him. This was the first in a series of Protestant missionary efforts in the lower part of the Valley of the Mississippi. He was a commissioner to the General Assembly from the Presbytery of Orange sixteen times and was Moderator of that body in 1803. He died on July 25, 1826.
He helped train several ministers, including the Rev. Robert Wilson James.

The Rev. Jeremiah Halsey
(ca. 1735 - 1780)
   The Rev. Jeremiah Halsey was Tutor in the College of New Jersey (later Princeton) from 1757 to 1767. In 1767 he was ordained to the gospel ministry by the Presbytery of New Brunswick and sent out on a missionary tour to the South. Afterwards he was settled as a pastor, but the place of his location we do not know. He was for eleven years a trustee of the College. He died in 1780.

The Rev. Luther Halsey, D.D., LL.D.
(January 1, 1794 - October 29, 1880)
   The Rev. Dr. Luther Halsey was born on January 1, 1794, at Schenectady, New York, the son of Luther and Abigail (Foster) Halsey. He died on October 29, 1880, at Norristown, Pennsylvania. He was Professor of Theology in the Western Theological Seminary, Allegheny, Penn., 1829-37, and in the latter year went to the Chair of Ecclesiastical History and Church Polity in Auburn Theological Seminary but resigned in 1844. From 1847 to 1850 he acted as Professor of Church History in Union Theological Seminary, New York City.

The Rev. James Garland Hamner
(January 6, 1798 - January 29, 1887)
   The Rev. James Garland Hamner was born on Jan. 6, 1798, at Albemarle County, Virginia, the son of Samuel Hamner. He attended Hampden-Sydney College, graduating in 1819 and was a theological student under the Rev. Moses Hoge, 1819-20, and at Princeton Theological Seminary, 1820-23. He received an honorary doctorate in 1846 from the University of Delaware. He was licensed to preach the gospel by the Presbytery of East Hanover on October 16, 1822, ordained July 24, 1824, and was pastor at Pole Green Church, 1824-26; stated supply at Fayetteville, N. C., 1826-29; pastor at Frederick, Md., 1830-33; organizer and pastor of the 5th Church of Baltimore 1833-52; infirm, 1852-55. He was Pastor at New Haven, Conn., 1855-60; Park Church, Newark, N. J., 1860-61; and voluntary evangelist in Maryland and Virginia, 1861-77. He resided in Baltimore, 1861-87, where he died on January 29, 1887. He was received by the Presbytery of Winchester from Baltimore, April 20, 1866; dismissed to Chesapeake, March 8, 1870; moderator of the Synod, 1867. He married Olivia Murray in New York City about 1827 and Jane McElderry, in Baltimore December 9, 1830. He was the father of the Rev. J. G. Hamner, D.D., and grandfather of the Rev. J. G. Hamner, III.

The Rev. John Hampton
(d. February 1721)
   Whether the Rev. John Hampton was a native of Scotland or Ireland is unknown. He was called to Snow Hill in March 1707. He was "inaugurated" by Mr. McNish. He also served at Pitt's Creek. He died, February, 1721. He was one of the original members of the first presbytery formed in America.

The Rev. John Hanna
(b. pre-1740 - 1801)
   The Rev. John Hanna was licensed to preach the gospel by the Presbytery of New Brunswick about 1760. In April 1761, he was ordained by the same presbytery and settled as pastor of Alexandria, Kingwood and Bethlehem churches, NJ, where he remained until his death in 1801. Dr. Hanna was also a physician but it never interfered with his duties as a pastor or as a member of the various Church Courts.

The Rev. Nehemiah Henry Harding, D.D.
(October 1794 - February 17, 1849)
   The Rev. Dr. Nehemiah Henry Harding was born at Brunswick, Maine, October 1794. In early life he went to sea and in time became captain of a vessel trading with Newbern, N. C. One stormy night, while walking the deck of his tempest-tossed ship, Harding was converted. Quitting the sea, he entered into business in Raleigh, NC, and soon began preparations for the ministry. He studied two years at the University of North Carolina. In 1826 he went to Princeton Theological Seminary and studied two years there. He was licensed to preach the gospel by the Presbytery of Orange on November 6, 1828, and ordained by the same, April 18, 1829. He was installed pastor of Oxford Church, July 10, 1830, and in December 1835 became stated supply of the Milton Church, where he remained until he died on February 17, 1849. He was the founder of the Yanceyville Church and preached at Bethesda part of the time. He received his Doctor's Degree from the College of New Jersey.
   Dr. Harding had one son who entered the ministry, the Rev. Eph. H. Harding, D.D., of Kentucky.

The Rev. Solomon Hardy
   The Rev. Solomon Hardy was a minister at Greenville, Ill., in 1829 and attended the first meeting of the Presbytery of Centre in that year.

The Rev. John Harris
(pre 1734 - post 1779)
   The Rev. John Harris came from Wales while a child, with his father's family, who settled in Maryland. In 1754 he was licensed to preach the gospel by the Presbytery of New Castle and in 1756 he was installed pastor of Indian River Church, Del. This charge he resigned in 1759 and moved to the South and in 1772 he was pastor of Long Cane and two other churches in South Carolina, where he remained until 1779, when forced by declining health to resign the charge.

The Rev. Elias Harrison, D.D.
(January 22, 1790 - February 13, 1863)
   The Rev. Dr. Elias Harrison was the son of Thomas and Nancy (Osborn) Harrison and was born on January 22, 1790, in New York City. He entered the College of New Jersey (later Princeton) in 1812 and was Tutor from 1814 to 1816. He studied theology at the College of New Jersey and was licensed to preach the gospel by the Presbytery of New Brunswick. Soon after he was ordained by the Presbytery of Baltimore in 1817. He was installed pastor of the First Presbyterian Church of Alexandria, Va., where he served for forty-six years. This was his only charge. He died on February 13, 1863.

The Rev. Jephtha Harrison, D.D.
(December 1795 - October 30, 1863)
   The Rev. Dr. Jephtha Harrison, the son of Abijah and Sarah (Ogden) Harrison, was born in Orange, NJ, in December 1795. He was educated at the College of New Jersey (later Princeton) and studied theology at Princeton Theological Seminary. He was first settled over the churches of Fincastle and Salem, VA, where he labored for three years. He moved to Memphis, TN, serving as the first pastor of the First Presbyterian Church in that city, where he was for six years; then to Florence, Ala., where he was pastor four years. He was agent for the Board of Domestic Missions one year, then pastor of the Church in Aberdeen, Miss., four years. He next moved to Burlington, Iowa, and after four years he moved to Fulton, Mo., in 1858 and supplied Auxvasse Church. At the time of his death, October 30, 1863, he was stated supply of Round Prairie and Augusta Churches, in Calloway County, MO, within the bounds of the Presbytery of Missouri.

The Rev. Joseph Cabell Harrison
(May 27, 1793 - September 7, 1860)
   The Rev. Joseph Cabell Harrison was the son of Robert C. and Annie (Cabell) Harrison and was born on May 27, 1793, at Clifton, Cumberland County, Virginia. In 1806 his parents moved to Fayette County, Kentucky, where his education was received, under the care of friends, Messrs. Blythe, Moore and McAllister. He subsequently attended Transylvania University but did not graduate. He pursued his theological studies under the Rev. Robert Bishop, D.D. He was licensed to preach the gospel by the Presbytery of West Lexington, October 6, 1824, and ordained by the same Presbytery, May 31, 1826. He entered upon his labors as a missionary in the Green River country. In the autumn of 1830 he spent three months as a missionary agent in Illinois. In 1833 he also founded Burlington, Richwood and Mount Horeb churches, Ky. In 1837 he gave up Lebanon in Grant County, including Hopewell and Carmel churches, Ohio. In 1835 he confined his labors to Burlington and Richwood churches, and the destitutions of Boone County, Ky. In 1845 he was stated supply of Ebenezer Church, KY, and thus he labored, year after year as a missionary. During the latter years of his life he was at times without any special charge. These years he devoted to labors among the poor. The northern part of Kentucky at the time, 1833, was destitute of Presbyterianism and as a pioneer preacher he labored in the cause of Sabbath Schools and Temperance, as well as preaching the gospel. In 1824 he was co-editor with the Rev. John Breckinridge, D.D., of The Western Luminary, published at Lexington, KY. He died on September 7, 1860.

The Rev. Joshua Hart
(ca. 1741 - October 3, 1829)
   After graduating at the College of New Jersey (later Princeton) in 1770, the Rev. Joshua Hart was ordained to the gospel ministry by the Presbytery of Suffolk, April 2, 1772, and was installed pastor of the Presbyterian Church at Smithtown, Long Island, April 13, 1774. He was released from his charge, September 6, 1787. Subsequently, he continued to labor as he had opportunity, until his death on October 3, 1829. He was one of the delegates (commissioners) to the first meeting of the General Assembly in 1789.

The Rev. Edwin F. Hatfield, D.D.
(January 9, 1807 - September 1883)
   The Rev. Dr. Edwin F. Hatfield was the son of Oliver S. and Jane (Mann) Hatfield, and was born in Elizabethtown, N. J., January 9, 1807. He graduated at Middlebury College, Vt., in 1829. He studied theology at the Seminary in Andover, Mass., 1829-31, and was licensed to preach the gospel by the Third Presbytery of New York, October 6, 1831, and ordained by the same Presbytery at New York, May 14, 1832. From October 1831 to February 1832 he preached at Rockaway, N. J., as an assistant of the Rev. Barnabas King, D.D. From March 1832 to September 1832 at Orange, N. J., he was an assistant of the Rev. Asa R. Hillyer, D.D. He was pastor of the Second Presbyterian Church of St. Louis, Mo., from October 1832, to February 1835. He was pastor of the Seventh Presbyterian Church of New York from July 1835 to February 1856 and of the North Presbyterian Church of New York from February 1856 to October 1863. He resigned and retired from the pastoral work on account of loss of health. He remained one year in retirement when he became special agent of the Union Theological Seminary in New York, December 1864, and in the following year obtained for the Seminary an endowment of one hundred and fifty thousand dollars. Two years were then occupied in writing and preparing for the press a "History of Elizabeth, New Jersey." In May 1868 he took the place of Dr. Kendall, Secretary of the Presbyterian Committee of Home Missions (abroad for his health), until October 1868, from which time he was Secretary of the Freedmen's Department of the same Committee. In January 1870 he again became special agent of Union Theological Seminary, in order to raise five hundred thousand dollars. He was Stated Clerk of the Third Presbytery of New York, since October 1838, and of the General Assembly, since May 1846. He was elected Moderator of the General Assembly which met at Saratoga, N. Y., in 1883. He died in September 1883.
   He was the author of "Universalism as it is," "Memoir of Elihu W. Baldwin, D.D." and "St. Helena and the Cape of Good Hope."

The Rev. Philip Courtlandt Hay, D.D.
(July 25, 1793 - December 27, 1860)
   The Rev. Dr. Philip Courtlandt Hay was a son of Major Samuel Hay, an officer in the army of the Revolution, and of Jane (Price) Hay. He was born on July 25, 1793, at Newark, NJ. He took his first degree in the Arts, with honor, at the College of New Jersey (later Princeton) and prepared for the ministry under the instruction of his pastor, the Rev. Dr. James Richards. He was licensed to preach the gospel by the Presbytery of Jersey, October, 1820, and soon after ordained over the Church at Mendham. For eleven years he was pastor of the Second Church, Newark, until he resigned due to broken health. He afterwards accepted an invitation to Geneva, N. Y., where his health again gave way under a ministry of several years. He then sought recovery and usefulness as the head of a family school. Subsequently, he accepted a call to Oswego, but he could not sustain the charge, and in 1855 he returned to the home of his childhood and, after resting for a time, undertook the management of a classical school. In 1849 he filled the Moderator's Chair in the General Assembly. He died on Dec. 27, 1860.

The Rev. Daniel Hayden
(April 9, 1781 - August 27, 1835)
   The Rev. Daniel Hayden was converted during a revival of religion. He was born on April 9, 1781, in Western Pennsylvania. He was graduated at Jefferson College in 1805. After his graduation, for about three years, he had charge of Greensburg Academy and retained his connection with it until 1807 or 1808, when he was licensed to preach the gospel by the Presbytery of Erie. He became pastor of the Pleasant Ridge Church (earlier called Duck Creek) and Montgomery (Hopewell) under the care of the Presbytery of Cincinnati in 1810. He remained pastor of Hopewell until April 8, 1819, and at Duck creek until he died on Aug. 27, 1835.

The Rev. Joseph Washington Henderson
(pre-1758 - post-1824)
   The Rev. Joseph Washington Henderson was licensed to preach the gospel by the Presbytery of Donegal sometime between 1778 and 1781, and became the pastor of the Presbyterian Church of Great Conewago, Penn., where he remained until 1797. From 1799 to 1824 he was pastor of the churches of Bethlehem and Ebenezer in Western Pennsylvania.

The Rev. Thomas Henderson
(b. pre 1750)
   The Rev. Thomas Henderson was the minister of Edisto Island,South Carolina, from 1770 to about 1775.

The Rev. Hugh Henry
(ca 1728 - 1763)
   The Rev. Hugh Henry was graduated at the College of New Jersey (later Princeton) in 1748 after having prepared with Samuel Blair at Fagg's Manor. After studying theology, he was ordained to the gospel ministry by the Presbytery of New Castle in 1751 and settled as pastor of the churches of Rehoboth, Wicomico and Monokin, in Maryland. Rev. Henry died in 1763.

The Rev. John Henry
(b pre-1690)
   The Rev. John Henry was ordained to the gospel ministry by the Presbytery of Dublin and came to Maryland in 1709, having been invited, on the death of Mr. Makemie, to be his successor. He was admitted a member of Presbytery in 1710 and received a call from Rehoboth. He died before September 1771.

The Rev. Robert Henry
(pre-1732 - May 8, 1767)
   The Rev. Robert Henry was a native of Scotland and was licensed to preach the gospel by the Presbytery of New York. In 1752 he was sent by the Synod to Virginia. In 1753 he was ordained by the Presbytery of New Castle and on June 4, 1755, was installed pastor of Cub Creek in Charlotte County, Virginia, and Briary, in Prince Edward County, both then in Lunenburg County. Rev. Henry was called to the Steele Creek Church in North Carolina in 1766 but never entered upon the charge, due to his death on May 8, 1767.

The Rev. Thomas Charleton Henry, D.D.
(September 22, 1790 - October 4, 1827)
   The Rev. Dr. Thomas Charleton Henry was born on September 22, 1790, in Philadelphia. He was graduated at Middlebury College, with high honor, in 1814. He began his preparation for the ministry before the close of his college life, and immediately after his graduation entered the Seminary at Princeton, where he remained for two years. He was licensed to preach the gospel by the Presbytery of Philadelphia, April 17, 1816, but in October was dismissed to join the Presbytery of New Castle, by which he was subsequently ordained. For two successive years he performed gratuitously the work of a missionary. Several months of this period were passed at Lexington, Ky., as a preacher. In November 1818 he was installed pastor of the First Presbyterian Church in Columbia, S. C., and labored there the rest of his life. In 1827 the yellow fever struck Charleston and Dr. Henry, feeling that it was his duty to remain with his flock, was attacked with the disease. He died on October 4, 1827.
   In addition to several sermons, he published a little volume on "Popular Amusements" and his "Letters to an Anxious Inquirer."

The Rev. John Herrick
   The Rev. John Herrick was a minister in Carrollton, Illinois, in 1829 and was present at the first meeting of the Presbytery of Centre in that year.

The Rev. Francis Herron, D.D.
(June 28, 1774 - December 6, 1860)
   The Rev. Dr. Francis Herron was born on June 28, 1774, near Shippensburg, Cumberland County, Pennsylvania. He was graduated at Dickinson College, May 5, 1794. He studied theology under the Rev. Robert Cooper, D.D., his pastor, and was licensed to preach the gospel by the Presbytery of Carlisle, October 4, 1797. He became a missionary, passing through Pittsburg, Penn., and extending his tour as far West as Chillicothe, Ohio. Stopping for the night in a tavern at Six Mile Run, near Wilkinsburg, Penn., the people prevailed upon him to stay until the following Sabbath, which he did and preached to the people. His journey was resumed the next day.
   On his return from Chillicothe he visited Pittsburg. The keeper of the tavern where he lodged proved to be an old acquaintance, and at his request he consented to preach. In the evening a small congregation of about eighteen persons assembled.
   Dr. Herron preached for the Rev. Dr. John McMillan at the Chartiers Church during a revival season. He also preached at the Buffalo Church. The people presented him a call and strongly urged him to accept it. He, however, decided to return to the vicinity of his home, especially as a call from Rocky Spring was awaiting him. This call he accepted, and he was ordained and installed as pastor of that church by the Presbytery of Carlisle, April 9, 1800.
   After a very successful pastorate of ten years at Rocky Spring, Mr. Herron was installed pastor of the First Presbyterian Church of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, in June 1811. In 1850 he resigned from this church. He died on December 6, 1860.
   Dr. Herron was elected Moderator of the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church at its session at Philadelphia in 1827. The Western Foreign Missionary Society, from which our Foreign Missionary Board sprang, and from the beginning of which the board should date its origin, received his cooperation.
   For many years, Dr. Herron was a Trustee of Jefferson College. He was for a long time President of the Board of Directors of Western Theological Seminary.

The Rev. Nathanael Hewitt, D.D.
(August 28, 1788 - February 3, 1867)
   The Rev. Dr. Nathaniel Hewitt was born on August 28, 1788, in New London, Conneticut, and was graduated at Yale College in 1808. He studied theology at Andover Seminary and was licensed to preach the gospel by the New London Congregational Association, September 11, 1811. He became pastor of the Presbyterian Church at Plattsburg, N. Y., in July, 1815. In 1820 he accepted the pastorate of the Congregational Church in Fairfield, Conn. In 1830 he became pastor of the Second Congregational Church in Brigeport, Conn., resigning it in 1853. The First Presbyterian Church of that place was formed by a large number of his friends and he became its pastor. He continued as its minister until he died on February 3, 1867.

The Rev. George Hill
(March 13, 1764 - June 9, 1822)
   The Rev. George Hill was born on March 13, 1764, in York County, Pennsylvania, and when about nineteen years of age, moved with his father and family to Fayette County. His literary studies were prosecuted chiefly under the direction of the Rev. James Dunlap; his theological studies probably under the Rev. Jacob Jennings; and he was licensed to preach the gospel by the Presbytery of Redstone, December 22, 1791. On November 13, 1792, he was installed pastor of the united congregations of Fairfield, Donegal and Wheatfield; and a new congregation, called Ligonier, having been formed between Donegal and Fairfield. He continued to labor in these three last named churches until he died on June 9, 1822.

The Rev. William Hill, D.D.
(March 3, 1769 - November 16, 1852)
   The Rev. Dr. William Hill was the son of Joseph and Joanna (Read) Hill and was born on March 3, 1769, in Cumberland County, Virginia. He was graduated at Hampden-Sydney College in 1788. Shortly afterwards he began the study of theology under the direction of President Smith and was licensed to preach the gospel by the Presbytery of Hanover, July 10, 1790. For two years immediately succeeding his licensure he acted as a missionary under the commission of Synod, in the lower counties of Virginia and through the upper counties to the Blue Ridge, from Tennessee to Maryland, and especially in the counties in the lower part of the Valley. He then settled in Berkeley (now Jefferson) County, Va. In 1800 he became pastor of the Presbyterian Church in Winchester. In 1834 he became pastor of the Briery Presbyterian Church in Prince Edward County, where he remained for two years, and then accepted the pastorate of the Second Presbyterian Church, Alexandria, VA, which, by reason of growing infirmities, he resigned in two years. He died in Winchester on November 16, 1852.

The Rev. James Hillhouse
(d. November 17, 1835)
   The Rev. James Hillhouse was from Pendleton District, South Carolina, and settled at Greensborough, Greene County, Alabama, in 1822, where he labored for many years. He organized the church in that place, and also Carmel, Fairview, Marion, and Cedar Grove. He died at Greensborough, Nov. 17, 1835.

 
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